"Naizen, Southern Barbarians Come to Trade, About1600"
Ink, color, gold, gold leaf on paper. Anonymous Loan. Courtesy Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.
"Naizen, Southern Barbarians Come to Trade, About1600" Ink, color, gold, gold leaf on paper. Anonymous Loan. Courtesy Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

Member Tour of “Made in the Americas: The New World Discovers Asia”

On Saturday, December 5, the Decorative Arts Trust will offer an exclusive curator-led tour of the groundbreaking exhibition “Made in the Americas: The New World Discovers Asia” at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Curated by Trust member Dennis Carr, this is the first large-scale exhibition to examine the profound influence of Asia on the arts of the colonial Americas.

José Manuel de la Cedra, Desk on Stand, 18th Century. Lacquered and polychromed wood with painted decoration. On loan from The Hispanic Society of America, New York, NY. Image Courtesy of Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.
José Manuel de la Cedra, Desk on Stand, 18th Century.
Lacquered and polychromed wood with painted decoration. On loan from The Hispanic Society of America, New York, NY. Image Courtesy of Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

Although the flow of style and goods from Europe to the Americas is a standard tenant of decorative arts scholarship, a wider view of the Pan-American scene reveals a more complex view. Blocking Columbus’ theoretically direct route to the Far East, the Americas became a trading hub, a place where everything from textiles and ceramics to decorative screens and case furniture arrived from Asia on its way to Europe, and luxury goods from the colonizing powers made their way back.

Featuring nearly 100 of the most extraordinary objects produced in the colonies, the show explores the rich, complex story of how craftsmen throughout the hemisphere adapted Asian styles in a range of materials. “To be a colonial citizen in the Americas,” states Carr, “was to be a global citizen. Households in this period frequently contained goods collected from across the world, testifying to the complex material lives of their owners.” These objects established links with the sources of Asian luxury goods, endowing their owners with commercial prestige, regardless of whether they had directly imported them from the Far East, waited for them to disseminate back from Europe, or had been manufactured in the Americas themselves thanks to the stylistic inspirations of local artisans.

The benefit is free to our members, but registration is required. Tours will be offered on Saturday, December 5, 2015, at 1 PM and 2 PM and participation is capped at 25 people per tour. Members can register online through our website. For more information about the show, see the review from the New York Times.

 

Leave a Reply